Exploring your motivations at orientation

"I'm planning on a double major with two minors and would like to spend at least one semester abroad."

Once in a while when we sit down one-on-one with an incoming student at orientation they begin their conversation with a statement like the one above.
"I'm planning on a double major with two minors and would like to spend at least one semester abroad."

Once in a while when we sit down one-on-one with an incoming student at orientation they begin their conversation with a statement like the one above. While we pride ourselves on ambitious students, we admit sometimes students are overwhelmed by what they think they need to accomplish in order to meet their future goals. Below are some things we encourage you to consider when thinking about what you want to get out of your experience here at the U, and how you will best transition into your career.

It's okay to explore! Some students may feel they need to come into college decided on a major. Sometimes the students who believe they need or want multiple majors, may just need more time to explore in order to choose between multiple majors. We have many ways to explore majors in the College, including the CSE 1001 course, an exploring major fair, and even optional one credit introductory courses.

You may reach your goals more effectively by focusing on one major as an undergraduate and then pursuing graduate school.
While graduate school isn't necessary for everyone's career or academic goals, it is not uncommon for students (especially in Engineering) to pursue a different field in graduate school. Some common examples are:

  • Bachelor of Science (B.S) in Mechanical Engineering to a graduate program in Biomedical Engineering
  • B.S. in Mathematics to a graduate program in Computer Science
  • B.S. in Chemistry to a graduate program in Chemical Engineering
  • Science or Engineering Undergraduate Degree to a Master of Business Administration program

Academic experiences are one of many ways to develop a skillset. You don't need to major in a foreign language to learn or demonstrate proficiency. You may choose to take some courses on campus and hone your skills through online language learning, conversation clubs, or even studying abroad. You can also consider joining a student group related to a field you enjoy but don't intend to major in!

Most internship, career, or graduate school interviews don't start and end with your academic background.
Learning to articulate your motivations behind why chose your academic and extra-curricular experiences in college is important, so don't deny yourself the opportunity to explore and make an informed decision. Your academic advisor will be here to help you navigate your journey!