Freshman seminars

Freshman seminars are a great way for incoming first year students to delve into a topic of interest with a small group and faculty member. Limited to 15 -20 freshmen, these courses will allow you to get to know your classmates, professor, and contribute to course dialogue on a regular basis. Faculty members have specifically designed these courses to provide a unique twist on their area of expertise. Seminars may also satisfy certain Liberal Education requirements.
Freshman seminars are a great way for incoming first year students to delve into a topic of interest with a small group and faculty member. Limited to 15 -20 freshmen, these courses will allow you to get to know your classmates, professor, and contribute to course dialogue on a regular basis. Faculty members have specifically designed these courses to provide a unique twist on their area of expertise. Seminars may also satisfy certain Liberal Education requirements.

Below are a couple of our recommendations, but be sure to check out all of your options in the Freshman Seminar booklet you received at Orientation or online. Don't forget, you can also take a freshman seminar in the Spring!

Fall 2014

Tackling the World's Biggest Problems: Designing Solutions with Impact
CSE 1905 Section 003 1 credit
This seminar is about solving big problems, learning by doing, and identifying actions to find out whether a solution will work. Teams will work with other first-year students from the Carlson School of Management to identify a problem and propose a solution. Through a competition, teams will seek up to $1,000 in funding to implement their idea.
This seminar is taught by Julian Marshall an Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Civil Engineering department.

Emerging Technologies in Israel
PHYS 1904, Section 001 LE: Global Perspectives 3 credits.
This Freshman Seminar Abroad will focus on challenges that people face and how emerging technologies can work to address these challenges We will look at Israel as a "startup nation," as it has the most new technological companies in the world relative to its population. Over spring break, we will travel together to Israel to examine these themes and observe firsthand cutting-edge technologies in areas such as seawater desalination, biomedical devices, computer and Internet security, military applications, solar energy, and more.
This seminar is taught by Marvin Marshak, Professor of Physics and Director of Undergraduate Research at the U of M.

Geology of Minnesota

ESCI 1901, Section 001 LE: Environment 1 credit
Understanding interactions between the Minnesota environment, natural resources, ecosystems, and human activity requires a grasp of the structure and history of our landscape, from the Mississippi River basin to the Red River Valley and the Lake Superior basin.The first full-day field trip will examine the water resources of our rivers and lakes, and a second full-day field trip will examine how geology controls our well water supply.
The instructor, Harvey Thorleifson, is a Minnesota state geologist.